Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Our Backyard


In the center of this picture, you can see the roof of our farmhouse. The gigantic maple tree in our front yard is changing color from the top down. I took this picture while hiking up the North Creek Ski Bowl on a trail named Moxham.

Leaves floating in Roaring Brook.
Heart-shaped golden leaf
Aster
Esther
Esther panting after chasing a pack of turkeys.
Stanley
Stanley watching leaves float down a mini waterfall.
Looking down Roaring Brook
Meandering home through Peaceful Valley, I sang a song called "The Magic in Me" by our friend Jamie Notarthomas.
 It's a children's song. Check it out on video: .

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CCoQtwIwAg&url=http%3A%2F%2Fvimeo.com%2F9046052&ei=rMYrVOrBAY-0yATwtYD4Bg&usg=AFQjCNHHjcDGF5Z0YzHIFteClU1F7Sj-uA&sig2=0Xc_z7Qee6O5OrjWgQ5L2Q&bvm=bv.76477589,d.aWw

Monday, September 29, 2014

The Hudson River Gorge is Gorgeous


It was a warm, sunny, colorful weekend in the Hudson River Gorge.
Almost everyone swam.
Photos taken in the Narrows by Jim Swedburg

Photo by Jim Swedberg
Photo by Jim Swedberg
Entering Mile-Long Rapid ...
 ... the walls overlap in the distance.
This is one of my favorite vistas in the Gorge.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Tranformation of Trees

Long Lake
I fluttered home from Long Lake today trying to capture the most vibrant shade of red I could find without causing an accident.
Long Lake
Long Lake
Traffic-stopping trees along Long Lake
Long Lake with autumn-tinted mountains in the background.
Blue Mountain Lake
Lake Durant
Guide Smiley in the Guide's Pool on the Indian River.
I've seen more Monarch Butterflies this week than I did all summer. I've been looking and luring them in with milkweed. Milkweed is essential to Monarch reproduction in the Adirondacks. Check out www.adkaction.org for more information about helping Monarchs.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Esther's Family on the Hudson in Newcomb


Esther's mother Micah, brother Chipolte, "Chip", and friend see something by the river.
Esther's brother Chip snuggling with dad Ike.  

Monday, September 15, 2014

Promoting Local Foods


Pole beans harvested the first week of school from the Corner Garden at Long Lake Central School.
Harvesting garlic this summer.
Harvesting rhubarb this summer.

Cucumbers to be harvested in the upcoming weeks.
Check out North Country Public Radio's staff blog,"All In", for entries related to the Corner Garden:

http://blogs.northcountrypublicradio.org/allin/author/ellenrocco/page/2/

http://blogs.northcountrypublicradio.org/allin/2014/08/31/where-should-cooking-be-taught/

Interview with Todd Moe from 11/28/12:

http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/story/20971/20121128/sharing-a-garden-in-long-lake

Sunday, September 14, 2014

The Most Endangered River in America

“The key to preservation is education; part of education is being out in wilderness.”
- Nick Grimes, OARS at www.oars.com
Map of San Joaquin River
A map of the San Joaquin River, from its headwaters in the Sierras near Yosemite, to beneath the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Map from www.CNN.com
John D. Sutter, a novice kayaker, walked, paddled, and dragged his kayak along the entire 417-mile stretch of river.

John D. Sutter wrote:

"We’re in the era of dead rivers -- a time when they’ve been so dammed, diverted and overused that many of them simply cease to flow.

Last year, CNN readers voted for me to do a story on the “most endangered” river in the country as part of my  Change the List project. Many rivers could vie for that title. Earlier this year, the Colorado River flowed to the sea for the first time in decades -- and that took an international agreement. The Rio Grande, which forms the U.S.-Mexico border, often doesn’t make it to the ocean, either. And the Mighty Mississippi is so polluted by farms that it feeds a Connecticut-sized “dead zone” in the Gulf. The advocacy group, American Rivers, www.americanrivers.org, however, chose the San Joaquin as the “most endangered” river in 2014 because it’s at a turning point. Depending on what happens soon, it could become a river reborn, or a drainage ditch.

I had a personal reason for wanting to kayak the river, too.

“Most people are on the world, not in it,” wrote John Muir, the famous naturalist who traveled the Central Valley and the Sierra Nevada and whose journals I would carry with me down the San Joaquin.

I think this notion of being disconnected from the natural world is especially pronounced when it comes to rivers."

 Check out John's blog about his enlightening journey: 

http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2014/09/opinion/endangered-river-ctl/

Saturday, September 6, 2014

Confluence of Dogs


Esther, Ellie and Stanley in the Guide's Pool, the calm pool of water where Indian/Hudson River trips begin.


Stanley eating grass at the confluence of the Indian and Hudson Rivers.
Ellie chewing on a stick at the confluence.
Esther exploring the confluence for the first time.
Confluence of three dogs over a stick.